Fitness over 40 is as simple and as easy as fitness UNDER 40. However, people over 40 do have some things to consider before they leap into any old fitness program. So let get started. I could tell you about people like Kelly Nelson and Morjoie Newlin, two female bodybuilders. They’re not your typical bodybuilders. Kelly Nelson first began training with weights in the early 1980’s at age 53 and was still competing in the 21st century in her late 70’s…in a bikini…and lookin’ good if I may say so! Morjorie Newlin was in HER 70’s before a 50 pound bag of cat litter convinced her that if she didn’t do something, old age was going to be a difficult time. That’s when she began a fitness training program that included weightlifting. Morjorie Newlin was participating in bodybuilding competitions, and winning, in her 80’s! Same comment…in a bikini and lookin’ good.

Now, obviously, these are special ladies who put in a lot of extra effort to accomplish some specific goals, but it does make a point. Life…and fitness…does not have to end at 40. Both of these ladies STARTED their fitness careers after age 40. Kelly Nelson was 53 and Morjorie Newlin was 72. Years later, both were still active in their chosen fitness areas and still enjoying life as well as, or better than, many in their 30’s or 40’s.
Fitness over 40? Heck, all around the globe, people in their 80’s are skiing, hiking, canoeing, biking. Some, not so adventurous, are lifting weights or sweatin’ along with Richard Simmons. Some are black belts in Karate, and some quietly and calmly practice yoga or tai-chi.
As easy as this sounds, fitness over 40 requires regular performance of the proper exercises. Just as in our 30’s or 40’s, sitting in the easy chair, clicking the remote, doing 16 ounce curls with a Miller Lite just doesn’t cut it. However, it is not necessary to pack up and head for the gym and try to keep up with the hard body cuties, either. It IS necessary to pick an exercise program or physical activity, combine that with some healthy eating habits…AND STICK TO IT!
Even over 40, the benefits normally associated with a regular, moderate exercise program will kick in, but for seniors, some benefits are of special importance.
People over 40 tend to break bones, usually from falling.
As we age, bones weaken, as do muscles. We lose some of our proprioception, the perception of stimuli relating to a person’s own position, posture, equilibrium, or internal condition. Our ability to react quickly to a loss of balance, whatever the source, or to avoid an obstacle or actual peril becomes diminished.
Exercise helps bones stay strong and exercises such as weightlifting and other resistance training help your body maintain balance and stability. Weight bearing and resistance exercises assist the body in maintaining proprioception by improving the connections and conditions of the muscles and their anchoring in bone. This training also triggers the reconditioning of the signaling system from body to brain which allows the brain to

realize the danger and transmit the appropriate signals to muscles which can react to correct the situation. Weightlifting and resistance exercises can help give your muscles the strength and agility to respond to those signals if you are tripped, off balance, or in other peril requiring quick reaction.
People over 40 begin to lose their zest for living and experience more health crises.

Part of this is due to normal changes that take place as we grow older. Our bodies get thicker and lose the gracefulness of youth. Things seem to become heavier and harder to move, and we begin to feel aches and pains that often accompany aging. Some of those aches and pains may be due to arthritis, and other ills may also attack us as we seem to become prey to every passing cold or other social ailment, and also see some deadlier or more debilitating conditions crop up in our age group, if not in ourselves.
Regular exercise comes to the rescue here as well. It can help with weight loss, or it can help with weight management once we get to our appropriate weight. Regular, moderate exercise can keep joints supple, in many cases even joints under attack by arthritis.

regular, moderate exercise seems to be somewhat effective in helping ward off such common companions of aging as high blood pressure, type II diabetes, and even some forms of cancer.

We need exercises which will stretch muscles and joints, exercises which strengthen muscle, and exercises which improve our cardiovascular fitness. This is not really hard to do, however, and should not take a lot of time out of your life, particularly when you consider how much it will put back into your life.
You are more likely to stay on a physical fitness regimen if you enjoy it. However, things do tend to get stale over time. It doesn’t hurt to vary your approach from time to time in either the manner in which you do certain exercises, or by varying the exercises themselves. While not exact equals, for example, swimming, biking, and walking can be somewhat interchangeable as part of your fitness routine. In some cases, simply varying the environment, i.e. taking a walk in the park or botanical gardens as opposed your neighborhood may be all the variation you need to feel like you have put a little zing into your day-to-day workout existence.

While fitness over 40 can demand some of your time and attention that you might not want to surrender to it, the rewards in overall health, fitness, and enjoyment of life will far outweigh any investment you put into it. For more fitness tips and programs Join our club just Click here and enter your Email.

Enjoy Life

Calvin Nichols


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